bio-fuel

Ethanol in Brazil: a model to follow or to avoid? (Latin America mini-series 3 of 4)

Dario Gaeta, CEO, Paraiso Bioenergia S.A

 

Monday, May 5, 2014 | 04:15 PM - 05:15 PM | NVIDIA Auditorium, Jen-Hsun Huang Engineering Center | Free and Open to All

A review of environmental impacts of renewable electricity generation technologies from a life cycle perspective

Garvin Heath, Senior Scientist, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Monday, November 4, 2013 | 04:15 PM - 05:15 PM | NVIDIA Auditorium, Jen-Hsun Huang Engineering Center | Free and Open to All

Through systematic reviews and original research, this presentation will review evidence of environmental impacts of renewable electricity generation technologies compared, where possible, to their conventional incumbents. Evidence for greenhouse gas emissions, water and land use will be reviewed mostly from the perspective of life cycle assessment. Areas of uncertainty will be highlighted as suggestions for future research.

 

Related Themes:

Screening of "Switch," followed by a discussion with the film's producer Scott Tinker, and Stanford University professors Sally Benson, Margot Gerritsen, and Mark Jacobson

Scott W. Tinker, Bureau of Economic Geology, the State Geologist of Texas
Moderator: Sally Benson, Energy Resources Engineering, Stanford, with Margot Gerritsen, Energy Resources Engineering, Stanford; Mark Jacobson, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford

Monday, October 8, 2012 | 04:15 PM - 06:15 PM | NVIDIA Auditorium, Jen-Hsun Huang Engineering Center | Free and Open to All

What does the future of energy really hold? Join Scott Tinker on a spectacular global adventure to find out. Scott explores the world’s leading energy sites, from coal to solar, from oil to biofuels. Many of these sites are highly restricted and never before seen on film. Scott gets straight answers from the people driving energy today, international leaders of government, industry and academia. In the end, he cuts through the confusion to discover a path to our future that is surprising and remarkably pragmatic.

"Switch" is a balanced documentary, embraced and supported by people all along the energy spectrum – fossil and renewable, academic and environmental.

Related Themes:

Integrated Energy and Resource Recovery from Waste and Wastewater

Craig Criddle, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University

Richard G.Luthy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University

Monday, February 13, 2012 | 04:15 PM - 05:15 PM | NVIDIA Auditorium, Jen-Hsun Huang Engineering Center | Free and Open to All

 

 

 

 

 


Craig Criddle

 


Richard Luthy

       

By the end of the 20th century, the United States had about 15,000 wastewater treatment plants and 13,000 landfills. These systems were designed to prevent environmental harm and to protect public health. Other factors, such as energy costs and climate change, were not a consideration. Waste and wastewater were collected, transported to centralized facilities, treated to remove harmful agents, and the effluents and residuals discharged. Now these systems have reached their design life and are in need of revitalization. Energy costs, climate change, and demand for secure supplies of water, food and materials provide powerful incentives for technological innovation through the creation of circular markets. In such markets, wastewater becomes a resource for local production of freshwater and nutrients, and organic waste becomes feedstock for local production of energy and biomaterials. Many groups around the world are now developing technology to enable such innovation.

 

Related Themes:

California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard: A Debate

David Stern, ExxonMobil Refining and Supply Company and
Dan Sperling, Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California at Davis

Please note different venue (320-105) and day (Wednesday)

Wednesday, April 13, 2011 | 04:15 PM - 05:30 PM | | Free and Open to All

 

 

 

 

 


Dr. David Stern
Advanced Fuels Senior Advisor
ExxonMobil Refining and Supply Company

 


Professor Dan Sperling
Director, Institute of Transportation Studies
at the University of California, Davis

       

Abstract from Daniel Sperling:

The low carbon fuel standard (LCFS) is being implemented in California and the EU and is under serious consideration in over 10 states and Canadian provinces.  The LCFS provides a promising and durable policy framework to decarbonize transportation fuels.  It is performance based, harnesses market forces (through credit trading), and utilizes lifecycle principles.  Though one might prefer more theoretically elegant policies such as carbon taxes and cap-and-trade, those other instruments are not likely to be effective in the foreseeable future with transport fuels.  They would not be sufficient to induce large investments in electric vehicles, plug-in hybrids, hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, and advanced biofuels.  The implementation of LCFS faces various political, scientific, and implementation challenges, but that is not surprising for a policy that aims to transform the oil and biofuels industries.

Abstract from Dr. David Stern:

Challenges to Meet a Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS)

As part of AB32, California’s Climate Change Act, the California Air Resource Board (CARB) has enacted a Low Carbon Fuel Standard.  The LCFS mandates a reduction in fuel life-cycle carbon intensity (CI), versus a petroleum fuel (gasoline/diesel) baseline.  At low CI reduction targets, increased use of biofuel is needed to meet the target, but higher CI reduction targets (e.g., 10%) are infeasible without large numbers of electric vehicles, large use of very low CI biofuels, or both. 

This talk will review the challenges in meeting the LCFS, and why LCFS is a complex, cost ineffective, and non-transparent policy to reduce GHG’s.

  • On a cost per unit GHG reduction, transportation-fuel-related cost reductions substantially exceeds the cost of other GHG reductions
  • If policy goals are to promote biofuels or to electrify the fleet, direct and transparent regulations are better ways to meet these goals
  • If the policy goal is GHG reduction, the most efficient and cost effective approach is a broad based, revenue-neutral carbon tax

Our discussion will also review principles to consider in policy development. If society chooses to implement climate policy, such policies should: ensure a uniform and predictable cost of GHG emissions, let market prices drive the solution, minimize complexity, maximize transparency, and adjust to future developments in climate science and the economic impacts of climate policies.

 

Related Themes:

Global Cookstove Problems, and the Berkeley Darfur Stove

Ashok Gadgil, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California,  Berkeley

Monday, February 28, 2011 | 04:15 PM - 05:15 PM | NVIDIA Auditorium, Jen-Hsun Huang Engineering Center | Free and Open to All

In parallel with his research in Indoor Environment, Dr. Gadgil has a long record of innovative solutions to problems in the developing world. He has pioneered the way to accelerate access to compact fluorescent lamps for poor households in developing countries; invented and commercialized a method to affordably disinfect drinking water for poor communities; designed, tested, and then found a way to build, field-test, and disseminate thousands of fuel-efficient stoves to refugee women in Darfur; and invented and is currently field-testing an extremely low cost, robust, and technically reliable method to remove arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh and nearby regions.

 

Followed by a MAP Energy Social held in the Huang-Foyer (next to the NVIDIA Auditorium)

Related Themes:

Converting Sunlight Into Fuels -- the Role of Interface Catalysis

Jens K. Norskov, Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, SLAC

Wednesday, December 1, 2010 | 04:15 PM - 05:15 PM | Building 420, Room 40 | Free and Open to All

Essentially all sustainable energy systems rely on the energy influx from the sun. In order to store solar energy it is most conveniently transformed into a chemical form, a fuel. The key to provide an efficient transformation of energy to a chemical form is the availability of suitable catalysts, and we will need to find new catalysts for a number of processes if we are to successfully synthesize fuels from sunlight. Insight into the way the catalysts work at the molecular may prove essential to speed up the discovery process. The lecture will discuss some of the challenges to catalyst discovery, the associated challenges to science as well as some approaches to molecular level catalyst design. Specific examples will include the (photo-)electrochemical oxygen evolution and hydrogen evolution reactions, carbon dioxide reduction, and biomass transformation reactions.

No video available

Related Themes:

Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford: The Grand Challenge

Lynn Orr, Keleen and Carlton Beal Professor in Petroleum Engineering, Energy Resources Engineering Department Director, Precourt Institute for Energy

 

Panelists: 

Wednesday, October 6, 2010 | 04:15 PM - 05:15 PM | Building 420, Room 40 | Free and Open to All

Franklin M. ("Lynn") Orr, Jr. became the director of the Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford upon its establishment in 2009. He served as director of the Global Climate and Energy Project from 2002 to 2008. Orr was the Chester Naramore Dean of the School of Earth Sciences at Stanford University from 1994 to 2002. He has been a member of the Stanford faculty since 1985 and holds the Keleen and Carlton Beal Chair of Petroleum Engineering in the Department of Energy Resources Engineering, and is a Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment. His research activities focus on how complex fluid mixtures flow in the porous rocks in the Earth's crust, the design of gas injection processes for enhanced oil recovery, and CO2 storage in subsurface formations. Orr is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He serves as vice chair of the board of directors of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, and he chairs the Science Advisory Committee for the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and was a foundation board member from 1999-2008.

Related Themes:

National Academy of Sciences Report: America's Energy Future: Liquid Transportation Fuels from Coal and Biomass

Michael Ramage, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company (retired);
James Sweeney, Stanford University

Wednesday, September 30, 2009 | 04:15 PM - 05:30 PM | McCaw Hall, Frances C. Arrillaga Alumni Center | Free and Open to All

National Academy of Sciences Report: America's Energy Future: Liquid Transportation Fuels from Coal and Biomass

The volatility of oil prices, the large proportion of oil importation, and the massive contribution of greenhouse gases from the transportation sector motivates the United States to seek domestic sources of alternative transportation fuels with lower greenhouse emissions. The abundance of coal and biomass in the United States makes them attractive candidates to provide alternatives to petroleum-based liquid fuels. However, there are important questions about the economic viability, carbon impact, and technology status of these options.

The National Research Council report Liquid Transportation Fuels from Coal and Biomass: Technological Status, Costs, and Environmental Impacts provides a snapshot of the potential costs of liquid fuels from biomass by biochemical conversion and from biomass and coal by thermochemical conversion. The report concluded that alternative liquid transportation fuels from coal and biomass have the potential to play an important role in helping the United States address issues of energy security, supply diversification, and greenhouse-gas impacts. The various options have different greenhouse gas impacts, and the choices will most likely depend on U.S. carbon policy. Cellulosic ethanol, coal-to-liquid fuels, and coal and biomass to liquid fuels can be available commercially in the 2020 time frame if large-scale demonstrations of the conversion technologies are pursued aggressively in the next few years.

Related Themes:

Hydrocarbon-based Biofuels Via Fermentation - an Alternative to Conventional Biofuels

Neil Renninger, Co-Founder and Chief Technology Officer, ; Amyris Corporation

Wednesday, May 27, 2009 | 04:15 PM - 05:15 PM | Building 420, Room 40 | Free and Open to All

May 27, 2009 - Neil Renninger, co-founder and chief technical officer of Amyris, discusses a cost-effective sustainable approach to biofuel production using synthetic yeast fermentation on sugar cane feedstocks. The Energy Seminar meets during the academic year on Wednesdays, 4:15 to 5:15 p.m.

No video or speaker slides available

Related Themes:
Syndicate content